Monthly Archives: October 2013

Open access initiatives in the Global South affirm the lasting value of a shared scholarly communications system.

See on Scoop.itResearch communications

Developing countries stand to benefit greatly from a more open and equitable international scholarly communication system, but Dominique Babini argues new commercial enclosures to access are also e…

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Knowledge mobilization vs Communications

See on Scoop.itResearch communications

At the recent KM in the AM on Friday April 12 the discussion got a little heated as the group weighed in on knowledge mobilization and communications. We have decided to make this a topic of future debate.

Dorine Odongo‘s insight:

I have been following this discussion keenly, and of similar interest to me is science communications vs science journlism- is there a line between these two?

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Impact and Learning: How can we make research communications stickier?

See on Scoop.itResearch communications

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Research uptake and impact: are we in danger of overstating ourselves? four issues in the balancing act between research communication or advocacy.

See on Scoop.itResearch communications

Pressure to demonstrate concrete impacts on public policy is encouraging researchers to make grand claims about what we/they are likely to achieve.

Researchers must provide clear policy messages, carefully define the relevance of their research, be realistic about what can be achieved, and be clear about whether they’re practising research communication or advocacy.

 

There are four issues:

1. Clear research evidence doesn’t necessarily lead to clear policy messages.

 

2. Be careful how you define ‘policy relevance’

 

3. Be realistic about what can be achieved – think breadth of impact rather than depth

 

4. Be clear whether you’re practicing research communication or advocacy.

 

 

Source:

Louise Shaxson

LSE impact blog

Louise Shaxson is a Research Fellow in the Research and Policy in Development (RAPID) programme at ODI.

 

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Using Social Media as a Communication Tool in the Healthcare Industry

See on Scoop.itResearch communications

In recent years social media has become a vastly used communication channel for companies in all industries.  This includes the healthcare industry, although there are some guidelines that must be followed for medical practices, doctors, etc. who choose to use social media as a communication tool.

 

A major concern of utilizing social media in the healthcare industry involves HIPAA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, and more specifically, it’s Privacy Rule.  This is the first comprehensive Federal protection for the privacy of personal health information. 

Companies required to abide by HIPAA must ensure they do so when utilizing social media as well.  For example, an emergency room doctor in Rhode Island discussed a patient’s case on Facebook. The text contained enough detail to allow the patient involved to be identified, resulting in a violation of HIPAA’s Privacy Act and the termination of the doctor involved.

 

There are ways that those working in the healthcare industry can use social media as a tool while avoiding legal and regulatory entanglements.  Here are some examples:

 

1.       Information Creator:  Blogging is a great social media tool to relay information in your area of expertise.  This requires pre-existing knowledge and research, but can be a great way to interact with and inform people.  Press releases and best practice guides are also examples of how information can be relayed in this process.  Any of these writing materials can then be spread throughout social media sites, such as Facebook or Twitter.

 

 2.       Information Curator:  A curator collects, organizes and helps to reach understanding on a body of knowledge or information.  This technique allows you to use medical news, journals and articles that are published in your field to inform people.  Share these findings with your social media “followers.”  Your viewers, patients, etc. will then see you as a source of where they get there information.  This means you must ensure that the information you are sharing is relevant and trusted.

 

3.       Conversation Contributor:  As well as maintaining your own social media profiles, become involved in conversations happening on other social media pages.  For example, if a medical association posts a healthcare blog on their Facebook page, you could add your expertise by commenting on their post.  If you have written your own article or blog about the topic, sharing that as a comment as well will show your credibility to the conversation.  This will help develop traffic to your own social media profiles or websites and will help establish professional connections.

Applying any of these techniques can assist you in developing a social media strategy that keeps guidelines in mind.  However, utilizing all three techniques is the best way to helpmaximize social media exposure in the healthcare industry.

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AASW7

7th Africa Agriculture Science Week

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Research Utilization: Putting it into practice

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ILRI policies, instititions and livelihoods program

ILRI policies, instititions and livelihoods program

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